Marc History

MARC COMMUNITY RESOURCES, INC. – HISTORICAL OVERVIEW

1957

  • The Mesa Association for Retarded Citizens (Mesa ARC) was established by nine families having children with special needs.

1959

  • Mesa Public Schools agreed to provide financial support, if Marc School would provide classroom space and programming for Trainable Mentally Handicapped (TMH) students.

1962

  • Purchase of first permanent location at 525 South Wilbur, Mesa. Mamie Eisenhower visited the school in 1966.

1967

  • Mesa School District agreed to provide educational programs and classroom space for the trainable mentally retarded at Washington School. Ineligible trainable mentally handicapped continued at Marc School.


1972

  • Infant and preschool programs established.
  • Marc accepted physically as well as mentally handicapped children and began providing a day care and training program for the convenience of working parents.
  • Summer program started.
  • Name changed to Marc School for the Handicapped.

1972 – 1973
Major reorganization of the Association: new board elected; rewrote constitution and bylaws; committees formed; Marc became more than just a school facility.
1974

  • Vocational program established for adults.
  • Marc Center opened a Home and Community Based Services department to provide habilitation, attendant care and respite services in individuals’ homes.
  • Changed name to Marc Center for the Developmentally Disabled.

1976

  • First residential group home opened on Mesa Drive.
  • Marc Center and Mesa ARC focused on a dual role perspective of providing direct services and advocacy.

1978

  • Mesa ARC moved to its current facility at 924 North Country Club Drive, which was acquired through a City of Mesa Community Development Block Grant.

1980

  • Satellite vocational program opened in Apache Junction serving adults with developmentally disabilities.

1981

  • Marc Center awarded a three-year accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).
  • Marc Center’s Growing Years Preschool implemented a reverse mainstreaming program which brought typical children from the community into the program with the special needs children already receiving services. At this time, the program became licensed by the Department of Health Services to operate as a community child care provider.

1983

  • Marc Center’s Growing Years Preschool developed a financial agreement with Department of Economic Security Child Care Administration to provide subsidized preschool/child care services for low income families.

1984

  • Satellite facility in Apache Junction became Freestone Rehabilitation Center serving people with disabilities in the East Valley.
  • Marc Center received another three-year accreditation status by CARF.

1986

  • Construction on a state-of-the-art building for Growing Years Preschool began.

1987

  • Marc Center purchased an existing group home and purchased property and built another home. Number of group homes operated was 12.
  • New Growing Years Preschool building completed in October 1987.
  • Marc expands Vocational Services to include Supported Employment.

1988

  • Grand opening of preschool on February 5, 1988.

1989

  • Marc’s Community Living Services expanded the program to its 13th, 14th and 15th group homes in April (Jarvis), October (Alamo) and December (Desert Lane).
  • RIS (Adult Day Services) program opened to provide non-employment day program options to adults.

1990

  • Marc’s Community Living Services expanded the program to 19 residences to include Redmon, Quail Creek Apartments (2 settings), Sesame Street, and 75th Place.
  • 3 Marc Center Historical Overview
  • Marc Center received another three-year accreditation status by CARF.

1991

  • Marc Center established two additional community-based sites for its non-employment services for adults which provides community orientation and emphasizes activities of daily living.
  • Marc Center discontinued Home Management Services.
  • Marc’s Community Living Services expanded its program to 20 residences by adding a new group home (Dorcas Circle) which served non-ambulatory individuals.
  • Public Law 99-45 7 required that children 2 to 5 years of age receive special education services through their local public school district. As a result, Growing Years Preschool began providing integrated socialization services for children with special needs.
  • Marc Behavioral Health Services began operation as a subsidiary corporation to serve individuals with behavioral health challenges.

1992

  • Marc Center’s Community Living Services program added three new residential sites (Hope, Rio Vista, Sandal Ridge) for a total 24 settings serving 105 individuals.
  • Growing Years Preschool state-wide pilot project for child care for children with needs established.
  • Marc Center began providing psychiatric consultation for individuals receiving services who were dually diagnosed with a developmental disability and a mental illness. These services required psychiatric monitoring of medications as a part of their treatment plan.

1993

  • Marc Center received another three-year accreditation status by CARF.
  • Marc Center’s Community Living Services program re-aligned its residential sites to serve individuals at 23 settings, including Grove group home which was designated to serve the elderly.

1994

  • On the basis of input from consumers with mental retardation and following a national trend, the Mesa ARC officially changed its name to Mesa Arc, maintaining its dove logo, but changing its byline from “Association for Retarded Citizens” to “Serving people with disabilities since 1957”.

1995

  • Marc Center and Marc Behavioral Health Services merged into a single corporation.

1996

  • Marc Center’s Employment Related Services and Re-entry Facility received three-year CARF accreditation.

1997

  • 4 Marc Center Historical Overview
  • The behavioral health component of Employment Related Services transferred to a new facility on Ivyglen in Mesa.

1999

  • Marc Center doubles the number of person’s served in vocational related programs, serving in excess of 1,000 people per day.
  • Marc Center receives its 8th consecutive three-year national accreditation, the highest level of certification issued by CARF.
  • Marc embarks on a capital campaign drive to raise $3.3 million for construction of new facility.

2000

  • Marc Center expands its residential service program for people with SMI, serving an additional four people who live in their own home.
  • As a result of successful advocacy and the Mesa Public School system’s outstanding program structure to accommodate children ages 3 to 5, Marc Center shifts its focus from center-based child care to home- and center-based Early Intervention Services for children birth to three.

2001

  • Marc Center is approved by ValueOptions to own and operate permanent housing programs for people with serious mental illness.

2002

  • Marc Center receives its ninth consecutive 3-year national accreditation, the highest level of certification issued by CARF.
  • Marc Center suspends its affiliation agreement with the Arc of the U.S. and becomes a free-standing organization.

2002 – 2003

  • Marc Center completes its greatest growth spurt in history, expanding Behavioral Health programs in the areas of adolescent services, community living, vocational training/placement and outpatient clinic. Since 1980, Marc Center has increased its operating budget from $1 million to $18.2 million to accommodate the increased number of people served from 145 to 2,100.

2003

  • Marc Center held its first signature fundraising event at Falcon Field in April.
  • Following a successful capital campaign to raise $3.3 million, Marc Center broke ground on the construction of a 3-story 30,000 sq. ft. day treatment and training facility to be known as the Dustin D. Wolfswinkel Rehabilitation Center in honor of the Wolfswinkel Family.

2004

  • Marc Center conducts a successful $4 million campaign drive and dedicates the grand opening of its day treatment and training facility in honor of Dustin D. Wolfswinkel.

2005

  • 5 Marc Center Historical Overview
  • Marc Center receives its 10th consecutive 3-year national accreditation, the highest level of certification issued by CARF.
  • Marc Center embarks on a capital campaign drive to raise $5.2 million for construction of a new vocational training facility on the 924 North Country Club Drive campus.

2006

  • Marc Center completed the build-out of the third floor of the Dustin D. Wolfswinkel Rehabilitation Center which accommodates all of the accounting offices and centralizes administration.
  • Employment Related Services relocated temporarily to a rented facility and the prefabricated metal buildings were demolished in preparation for the construction of the new vocational training facility.
  • Behavioral Health Services acquired three new homes for residential services and established two Village programs to assist consumers in their personal recovery process by providing an integrated service package that makes use of natural community support systems. This national pilot project received state and national attention for its ability to demonstrate the success of the wellness recovery model.

2007

  • Marc Center celebrated 50 years of providing services to children and adults, and hosted the largest banquet ever held in the East Valley.
  • Marc Center broke ground on the construction of a 34,400 sq. ft. vocational training facility on the 924 North Country Club Drive campus.
  • Behavioral Health Services held the grand opening of its East Village Program and Outpatient Clinic.

2008

  • Marc Center receives its 13th consecutive 3-year national accreditation, the highest level of certification issued by CARF.
  • Behavioral Health Services held the grand opening of its West Village Program at 2750 West McDowell Road, Phoenix on April 24.
  • Marc Center expands its Community Day Services with the addition of a collaborative initiative with Cortney’s Foundation in Scottsdale, a 501(c)3 corporation that subcontracts its hybrid day services program to Marc Center.
  • HCBS program expansion occurred in northern Arizona (Prescott Valley), with a contract awarded by Yavapai Long-Term Care.
  • Marc Center replaced all remaining leased homes with acquired purchased residences.

2009

  • Marc Center held the grand opening of its new vocational training facility at 924 North Country Club Drive on January 15.
  • 6 Marc Center Historical Overview
  • Marc Center received tax exempt bond financing (Maricopa County IDA bond) saving $10,000 per month in costs existing debt service while expanding capital project capacity.
  • TecMarc, Inc., dba ProMarc Smart Property Management was created as a C corporation with Marc Center as the sole share holder.
  • Partners In Recovery, LLC was established as a collaborative partnership to acquire five outpatient clinics from Magellan Health Services (RBHA). The three organizations encompassing this LLC are Marc Center, Jewish Family and Children Services, and Recovery Innovations of Arizona. The five clinics are Metro Center Clinic, East Mesa Clinic, Gateway Clinic, West Valley Clinic and Wickenburg Clinic.
  • Marc Center collaborated with The Centers for Habilitation (TCH) to form FCS Premier, LLC (First Choice Services) to provide food services. Initially, services will be provided for Banner Corporate Center in Mesa allowing people with disabilities to serve meals to Banner corporate employees.
  • Marc Center acquired Advocates for the Disabled, Inc. to save Advocates from closing and to add eligibility support services to Marc Center’s portfolio.
  • Marc Center has acquired two multi-housing units for Behavioral Health Services consumers. ProMarc serves as the property management company for these sites. The Doran unit is a 4-plex and the Williams unit (El Jardin De Marc) is consists of five triplex units.
  • Marc Center begins design for The Village at Oasis Park, Phase I and received a HUD grant 811request (Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities) to build a 14-unit first phase complex.
  • Marc Center submitted application for a HUD grant (pending approval) for the Neighborhood Stabilization Program.

2010

  • On April 13, a grand opening was held for Blue Ribbon Bistro – FCS Premier’s food services at Banner Corporate Center in Mesa.
  • Marc Center’s Behavioral Health Services began a new program called Discover Program that offers treatment and support activities to assist transition-age youth (18 to 21 yrs.) in tasks and roles essential for living, learning and working in a community setting.
  • Marc Center’s Behavioral Health Services began a new program called Hope Network. This program focuses on improving housing stability and recovery outcomes for chronically homeless adults who are enrolled in the ABC HUD Housing program in Maricopa County and funded through a SAMHSA (Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration) grant.
  • Marc Center’s Behavioral Health Services began involvement with Project H3: Home, Health, Hope, a collaborative effort of community members from the non-profit, governmental and business communities in the Greater Phoenix area striving to end homelessness in our communities.
  • On October 25, a grand opening was held for Partners in Recovery’s east Mesa location at 4330 East University Drive.

2012

  • On December 1, 2012, the Marc Center changed its name to Marc Community Resources, Inc. to better reflect the vast services provided to the overall Arizona community.